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Top 100 (2013 revision)

Posted by martinteller on September 15, 2013

1. Fanny and Alexander (1982, Ingmar Bergman)

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2. Mahanagar a.k.a. The Big City (1963, Satyajit Ray)

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3. Casablanca (1942, Michael Curtiz)

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4. The Hole (1998, Ming-liang Tsai)

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5. A Woman Under the Influence (1974, John Cassavetes)

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6. Scenes From a Marriage (1973, Ingmar Bergman)

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7. Time of the Gypsies (1988, Emir Kusturica)

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8. Taxi Driver (1976, Martin Scorsese)

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9. Eraserhead (1977, David Lynch)

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10. Charulata (1964, Satyajit Ray)

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11. Rear Window (1954, Alfred Hitchcock)

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12. Seven Samurai (1954, Akira Kurosawa)

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13. Goodfellas (1990, Martin Scorsese)

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14. Aguirre: The Wrath of God (1972, Werner Herzog)

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15. The Shining (1980, Stanley Kubrick)

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16. Jules and Jim (1962, Francois Truffaut)

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17. Double Indemnity (1944, Billy Wilder)

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18. Revenge of a Kabuki Actor (1963, Kon Ichikawa)

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19. The Vertical Ray of the Sun (2000, Anh Hung Tran)

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20. All That Jazz (1979, Bob Fosse)

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21. The Seventh Seal (1957, Ingmar Bergman)

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22. Linda Linda Linda (2005, Nobuhiro Yamashita)

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23. Network (1976, Sidney Lumet)

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24. What Time Is It There? (2001, Ming-liang Tsai)

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25. The Trial (1962, Orson Welles)

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26. The Blues Brothers (1980, John Landis)

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27. Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981, Steven Spielberg)

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28. The Exterminating Angel (1962, Luis Bunuel)

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29. Nights of Cabiria (1957, Federico Fellini)

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30. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966, Sergio Leone)

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31. Stop Making Sense (1984, Jonathan Demme)

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32. Pather Panchali (1955, Satyajit Ray)

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33. Apocalypse Now (1979, Francis Ford Coppola)

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34. Hausu a.k.a. House (1977, Nobuhiko Obayashi)

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35. Play Time (1967, Jacques Tati)

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36. 8½ (1963, Federico Fellini)

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37. An Angel at My Table (1990, Jane Campion)

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38. All About My Mother (1999, Pedro Almodovar)

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39. El Norte (1983, Gregory Nava)

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40. The Scent of Green Papaya (1993, Anh Hung Tran)

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41. Innocence (2004, Lucile Hadzihalilovic)

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42. The Tree of Life (2011, Terrence Malick)

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43. Airplane! (1980, Jim Abrahams, David Zucker, Jerry Zucker)

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44. Drugstore Cowboy (1989, Gus Van Sant)

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45. The Wicker Man (1973, Robin Hardy)

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46. Vertigo (1958, Alfred Hitchcock)

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47. Winter Light (1962, Ingmar Bergman)

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48. Do the Right Thing (1989, Spike Lee)

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49. The Turin Horse (2011, Bela Tarr)

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50. High and Low (1963, Akira Kurosawa)

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51. Mulholland Drive (2001, David Lynch)

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52. Yojimbo (1961, Akira Kurosawa)

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53. Last Year at Marienbad (1961, Alain Resnais)

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54. Werckmeister Harmonies (2000, Bela Tarr)

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55. Safe (1995, Todd Haynes)

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56. Sweet Smell of Success (1957, Alexander Mackendrick)

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57. Underground (1995, Emir Kusturica)

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58. The Night of the Hunter (1955, Charles Laughton)

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59. Woman in the Dunes (1964, Hiroshi Teshigahara)

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60. The Long Day Closes (1992, Terence Davies)

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61. American Movie (1999, Chris Smith)

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62. Red Beard (1965, Akira Kurosawa)

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63. The Wayward Cloud (2005, Ming-liang Tsai)

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64. Songs from the Second Floor (2000, Roy Andersson)

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65. Syndromes and a Century (2006, Apichatpong Weerasethakul)

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66. Secrets & Lies (1996, Mike Leigh)

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67. Amélie (2001, Jean-Pierre Jeunet)

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68. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968, Stanley Kubrick)

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69. Picnic at Hanging Rock (1975, Peter Weir)

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70. Devils on the Doorstep (2000, Wen Jiang)

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71. Blue Velvet (1986, David Lynch)

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72. Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966, Mike Nichols)

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73. The Dead (1987, John Huston)

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74. Visage (2009, Ming-liang Tsai)

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75. The Story of Qiu Ju (1992, Zhang Yimou)

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76. Devi (1960, Satyajit Ray)

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77. Sita Sings the Blues (2008, Nina Paley)

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78. A Moment of Innocence (1996, Mohsen Makhmalbaf)

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79. The Lineup (1958, Don Siegel)

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80. The New World (2005, Terrence Malick)

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81. Three Colors: Blue (1993, Krzysztof Kieslowski)

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82. In the Loop (2009, Armando Iannucci)

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83. The Burglar (1957, Paul Wendkos)

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84. I Fidanzati (1963, Ermanno Olmi)

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85. Pratidwandi (1972, Satyajit Ray)

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86. The Royal Tenenbaums (2001, Wes Anderson)

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87. Sátántangó (1994, Bela Tarr)

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88. The Graduate (1967, Mike Nichols)

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89. Shame (1968, Ingmar Bergman)

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90. Cairo Station (1958, Youssef Chahine)

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91. Blade Runner (1982, Ridley Scott)

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92. Drowning by Numbers (1988, Peter Greenaway)

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93. A Page of Madness (1926, Teinosuke Kinugasa)

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94. A Man Escaped (1956, Robert Bresson)

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95. As I Was Moving Ahead Occasionally I Saw Brief Glimpses of Beauty (2000, Jonas Mekas)

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96. Pink Floyd: The Wall (1982, Alan Parker)

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97. The Seventh Victim (1943, Mark Robson)

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98. The Cloud-Capped Star (1960, Ritwik Ghatak)

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99. Thirst for Love (1966, Koreyoshi Kurahara)

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100. Stalker (1979, Andrei Tarkovsky)

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Another year, another re-evaluation of the films I call “my favorites”. There really aren’t many changes from last year’s list. The most obvious revision is that I’ve switched around my two highest Bergmans, giving me a new #1. This was the last thing I changed, just a spur of the moment decision. It felt like the right thing to do. Maybe it’s because I’m in a chipper mood today and wanted a somewhat more upbeat movie at the top than Scenes from a Marriage.

There have been a few other relocations within the list. Moving up are Linda Linda Linda, The Vertical Ray of the Sun, and All About My Mother. Slipping down are 2001: A Space Odyssey, I Fidanzati, Werckmeister Harmonies, and Pink Floyd: The Wall.

Then there are the replacements. Re-entering after a brief absence is A Man Escaped. I’ve finally accepted that Stalker is indeed one of my favorites, and after a second viewing, I made room for The 7th Victim. The only discovery from the past year that I’ve added is As I Was Moving Ahead, which joins Satantango as the only movies on the list I’ve seen only once (not coincidentally, also the two longest movies on the list). Three recent discoveries did get added to the 101-250 list: Girl Walk // All Day, Waiting for Happiness, and A Tale of the Wind.

Because 100 is a stubborn and inflexible number, four new entries means four got dropped. These are Love and Death (sadly leaving no Woody Allen), The Beautiful Washing Machine (I need to see it a third time before I can commit to it as a favorite), Even Dwarfs Started Small (recent rewatch revealed it’s no longer as dear to me) and The Wizard of Oz (I was pretty uncertain about including it the first time).

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5 Responses to “Top 100 (2013 revision)”

  1. JamDenTel said

    Just a couple of thoughts:
    – I’ve seen 41 of these films, seen large chunks of AMERICAN MOVIE and THE GRADUATE, and own 8 which I haven’t yet watched (including A WOMAN UNDER THE INFLUENCE, which I got yesterday–yay clearance rental sales). Some of these I really need to rewatch, like THE SEVENTH SEAL, NETWORK, AGUIRRE, and THE ROYAL TENENBAUMS. Some I wholly agree with–I’d make the case for 2001 being the greatest film ever made, were I called on to pick one, and GOODFELLAS, THE BLUES BROTHERS, IN THE LOOP, HAUSU, STALKER, AIRPLANE!, and 8 1/2 are all favorites of mine. Others wouldn’t make my list (CASABLANCA, for some reason, doesn’t do that much for me), but I get your rationale.
    – My biggest gaps on this list come from Asian cinema, and the shame is mine. I’ve yet to see any Ray (I can hopefully start to rectify.that), and directors like Ming-Liang Tsai are totally unknown quantities to me. I’ve got a lot to learn…and let’s not even get into Bergman.

    I really need to do a top 50 or something. Lists are fun.

  2. […] 100 is tricky–but drawing on the various best-films lists of critics, awards groups, and even my cousin, I compiled a good checklist against which I can measure myself.  Films marked with a single […]

  3. Viktor said

    This is a really beautiful list. I scent that we share the same film-sensibilities, though I’d have placed a bunch of Antonioni films on my list… You’re a lucky guy, that you’ve had the chance to watch many of these films, as many of these are rather hard to find, or immensely costly if you got to buy them.

    • Thanks Viktor! I like Antonioni, but none of his films have resonated with me enough to call a favorite. Look for an update of my top 100 some time this summer.

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